August 2015 | In Unusual Words

I haven't sat down to write one of these posts in a long while – though I am right now, as I feel like August deserves a couple of interesting words. Earlier this month, I switched this blog's name to Rustled Pages, and I'm glad I did; it still feels like entirely the right name for this blog. I also read a lot this month, and spent a lot of my free time writing. Here's to hoping I can keep all this up when I return to school next week (my past attempts at balancing school and blogging have been, well, fairly unsuccessful). Anyway, without further ado, August 2015 in a few unusual words:

Ostranenie:
(Russian, noun) Encouraging people to see common things as strange, wild and unfamiliar
In August, I remembered one of my favourite things to see in a book. I love authors who take seemingly normal events and, through their writing, transform them into something extraordinary. For once I'm not talking about Murakami – in fact, I'm specifically referring to Under the Skin by Michel Faber. Within this novel, Faber takes something as mundane and simple as hitchhiking and transforms it into something beyond strange.

Pluviophile:
(English, Noun) A person who loves/takes comfort from rain
I know August is a summer month, and that we should be enjoying the rare sunshine the UK offers us  – but I just love rain. Perhaps I romanticise rainy days, but I do adore the clich├ęd image of a day spent curled up in blankets, with a book and a cup of tea at the ready, as the rain hammers against the window pane. I just really, really enjoy the rain – simple as.

Finifugal:
(LATIN ADJ.) HATING ENDINGS; OF SOMEONE WHO TRIES TO PROLONG THE FINAL MOMENTS OF A STORY
Here's a simple fact: if I like a book, I have a lot of trouble letting the story go. In July, I read (and fell in love with) THE CRIMSON PETAL AND THE WHITE BY MICHEL FABER. In August, I started THE APPLE BY MICHEL FABER, which is a series of short stories set in the same Victorian London as THE CRIMSON PETAL AND THE WHITE. Though barely 200 pages, I've been reading this book over a long period of time – because I simply can't bare to be finished with Sugar's tale.

Delectation:
(ENGLISH Noun.) Delight; enjoyment; pleasure
Earlier on this month I received my GCSE exam results (if you're not from the UK, these are just qualifications for students aged 14–16). I won't go into details about what I got, but I'm absolutely over the moon (and still a little in shock) with my results. I also, by some miracle, managed to get full marks in one of my favourite subjects. I guess, more than anything, the word 'delectation' refers to the time after results day. In the run up to the day, I felt tense and stressed and struggled to blog/read/write – but, after I got my results, I was able to simply enjoy the rest of the holidays. Ultimately, exam results don't matter – though it's a lovely feeling to have them out of the way.

How was August to you?
Books read this month: Under the Skin, A Streetcar Named Desire, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running, The Buried Giant, Sputnik Sweetheart

4 comments:

  1. I love this post so much! Words are the best and 'finifugal' has now become a new favourite :-) I too hate letting go of the story... not when I love it so much! Well done on your GCSE results!

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    1. Thank you – these posts are so fun to write! Finifugal is such a fantastic word!

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  2. OSTRANENIE IS ONE OF MY FAVOURITE WORDS #great minds.
    ALSO congratulaaationnss to youuu for your GCSEs, what did you get 100% in? IF YOU SAY ENGLISH I WILL BE SO JEALOUS BECAUSE IT'S SO HARD TO GET FULL MARKS IN ENGLISH.
    *notes all these words down in journal*

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    1. When I discovered the word ostranenie I just knew I had to find a use for it! Thanks – congrats on your AS levels! It was actually history. :)

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